CCHCS Nurse of Year compassionate, understanding. - VA Central California Health Care System
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VA Central California Health Care System

 

CCHCS Nurse of Year compassionate, understanding.

Manuel Martin (right) discusses patient conditions with another nurse at morning report. Martin was selected as VA CCHCS’ Nurse of the Year recently.

Manuel Martin (right) discusses patient conditions with another nurse at morning report. Martin was selected as VA CCHCS’ Nurse of the Year recently.

By Cameron Porter
Thursday, June 7, 2018

FRESNO, Calif. – Sitting quietly, he listened as the Veteran cried, screamed and vented.

The young man, who had served in Southwest Asia Post 9/11 and suffered from Traumatic Brain Injury and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, was highly upset, wouldn’t engage, angry at the world and miserable with life. Accompanied by his parents, he had admitted himself into the VA hospital near suicidal. But no one at VA Central California Health Care System could connect with him.

No one except Manuel Martin.

The retired Air Force Major and Registered Nurse just listened. He listened, and he created a protected space. This allowed the Veteran to share and explore his feelings without judging him or limiting him. And he made a connection. From there, Martin was able to inject his compassion and understanding, his empathy and experiences, and his fears and faith.

At discharge, that same Veteran stopped by the nurse managers office, with a tear in his eye, to tell her about his interactions with Martin.

Nurse Martin sat with the Veteran while he cried. He listened to him while he was upset and shouting. And he hugged him when he was leaving, said Diane Palacio, a nurse manager with VA CCHCS.

"Just watching him with that Veteran made me cry too," she said.

Martin was recently selected as VA CCHCS’ Nurse of the Year.

"He is detail oriented, compassionate about his work, and he loves Veterans," said Palacio. "He’s the nurse you want at your loved one’s bedside."

He clearly demonstrates the criteria of Nurse of the Year, she added.

"It’s a great honor to be recognized because my job entails helping fellow Veterans," said Martin, who served 24 years in the Air Force, much of that time as a Navigator on bombers, tankers and cargo planes.

"I’m grateful to my superb nurse manager for nominating and trusting me. Giving care to my fellow Veterans has been very satisfying and fulfilling," said Martin, who has worked for the VA for nearly 7 years. "I feel fortunate and honored to be in a position where I can assist Veterans every day."

To go from a career in the Air Force as a Navigator, to starting over and becoming a nurse, to now being selected as VA CCHCS’ Nurse of the Year – "it’s a blessing," said Martin, who has been married for 35 years and has two daughters, one son and one granddaughter.

And as to why he decided to become a nurse at age 48, "my daughters and I decided together to follow my wife, and we all became nurses," he said with a smile.

But the California State University Bakersfield graduate knew earlier on that this would be his calling.

While deployed as the Assistant Deputy Commander for Operations in Kenya for Operation Restore Hope, Martin planned the medical evacuation of a severely injured Marine from Mogadishu, Somalia.

"The joy I felt when I was told the Marine was saved because he was quickly evacuated to a hospital inspired me to pursue a career in the medical field after I retired from the Air Force," said Martin. "I also knew in my heart then that it would be in the VA where I would like to work … to care for fellow Veterans."

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